Classics Curriculum

IB Classical Greek and Roman Studies (Standard Level)

Classical Greek and Roman Studies is available at Standard Level only.

Content
The following topics will be studied:

Greek culture:

  • Greek Epic – An in-depth study of Homer‘s Iliad.
  • Alexander the Great OR Athenian Vase Painting.

Roman culture:

  • Roman Epic – An in-depth study of Virgil’s Aeneid.
  • Augustan Rome.

How the course is taught
IB Classical Greek and Roman Studies is taught by one teacher. There is a balance of reading and textual analysis, discussion and independent work. Work in the classroom fosters intellectual inquiry and debate. Students are supervised through the process of completing their Internal Assessment.

Expectations/Homework
Teachers set regular homework tasks which might require students to research a question, answer questions on a text being studied, or prepare an essay or presentation for the class.  In addition to set tasks, students are expected to read around their subjects independently and prepare ahead. All students are expected to engage fully in lessons, keep up-to-date and to take responsibility for their learning.

The Extended Essay
IB students have to write an Extended Essay; they choose the title, research and write it by themselves. Candidates can choose any of their six subjects as the focus of this essay. The classical world offers a particularly rich field for an Extended Essay and candidates can opt to research and write about any aspect of Greek or Roman literature, philosophy, history or culture that appeals to them. The essay must be completed within 4000 words. Up to five hours of staff supervision are available to assist with the planning, research and execution of the Extended Essay.

Preparatory Work
All students complete summer work before entering the Lower Sixth and this provides them with an excellent introduction to the topics that we study. We encourage you to read around the subject as much as you can – both for enjoyment and for an academic boost.

IB Classical Greek (Higher Level)

Content
The language of Classical Greece: candidates study the works of Xenophon and translate an unseen passage from this author in the language paper (candidates are allowed a dictionary).
The literature of Classical Greece: candidates have a choice of two out of five set text topics; you could study Herodotus’ Histories, Homer’s Iliad, or the different versions of the Electra tragedy by Sophocles and Euripides.

IB Classical Greek (Standard Level)
How the course is taught

IB Classical Greek is taught by two teachers who share the language, literature and internal assessment components.

Expectations/Homework
Homework is set once a week by both teachers and will usually consist of:

  • Language work, such as a passage from Xenophon to translate, and/or revision of syntax or accidence
  • Preparing ahead in both set texts
  • Research work e.g., when working on the Dossier.

IB Greek is not a soft option and homework duties are not light; pupils are expected to keep up with work set, to maintain a high standard of work, to learn from mistakes and to read around the subject where necessary.

The Extended Essay
All IB students have to write an Extended Essay (4,000 words) in one of their subjects; they choose the title, research and write it by themselves as part of the IB learner profile.

Candidates can choose any of their six subjects as the focus of this essay; Classical Greek offers a particularly rich field for an Extended Essay and candidates can opt to research and write about any aspect of Greek literature, philosophy, history or culture that appeals to them.

Preparatory Work
We expect students to read a portion of their set text authors in translation and research the literary and/or historical context of the works before starting the course. We would also expect students to undertake some light translation work to ensure they remain up to speed with Greek grammar and vocabulary.

A Level Classical Civilisation
Content

Students study four equally weighted units:

  1. Either Greek architecture and sculpture or Women in Athens and Rome (Unit 1)
  2. Either Homer’s Iliad or Homer’s Odyssey (Unit 2)
  3. Either The Persian wars or Greek tragedy (Unit 3)
  4. Roman epic (Virgil’s Aeneid) (Unit 4).

How the course is taught
A Level Classical Civilisation is taught by two teachers who teach one topic each.

Expectations/Homework
Teachers set regular homework tasks which might require students to research a question, answer questions on a text being studied, or prepare an essay or presentation for the class.  In addition to set tasks, students are expected to read around their subjects independently and prepare ahead.  All students are expected to engage fully in lessons, keep up-to-date and to take responsibility for their learning.

Preparatory Work
All students complete summer work before entering the Lower Sixth and this provides them with an excellent introduction to the topics that we study at A Level. We encourage you to read around the subject as much as you can – both for enjoyment and for an academic boost.

A Level Classical Greek

Content
The language of Classical Greece: over two years, candidates will study a range of prose and verse authors with a view to finally tackling unseen passages from authors such as Thucydides and Euripides; candidates will also study how to translate from English-Greek although please note that this is NOT compulsory in the exam!

The literature of Ancient Rome: over two years, candidates will have the chance to study two prose and two verse texts; this year's candidates have studied excerpts from Homer’s Iliad, Lysias’ Against Simon, Sophocles' Antigone and Plato’s Phaedo.

How the course is taught
A Level Greek is taught by two teachers who divide the language and literature duties between them.

Expectations/Homework
Homework is set once a week by both teachers and should consist of;

  • Language work, such as an unseen passage to translate, and/or revision of vocabulary, syntax and/or ‘endings’
  • Preparing ahead in both set texts.

Classical Greek is not a soft option and homework duties are not light; pupils are expected to keep up with work set, to maintain a high standard of work, to learn from mistakes and to read around the subject where necessary.

Preparatory Work
We expect students to read a portion of their set text authors in translation and research the literary and/or historical context of the works before starting the course. We would also expect students to undertake some light translation work to ensure they remain up to speed with Greek grammar and vocabulary.

IB Latin (Higher Level)

Content
The Latin language of Ancient Rome: candidates study Cicero's legal speeches (prose) and Ovid's Metamorphoses (poetry) in order to translate a short passage from one of these two authors in the language paper (candidates are allowed a dictionary).
The Latin literature of Ancient Rome: candidates have a choice of two out of five themed selections of literature. These include Virgil, History, Love Poetry, Women and Good Living.

IB Latin (Standard Level)

Content
The Latin language of Ancient Rome: candidates study Cicero's legal speeches (prose) and Ovid's Metamorphoses (poetry) in order to translate a short passage from one of these two authors in the language paper (candidates are allowed a dictionary).
The Latin literature of Ancient Rome: candidates have a choice of two out of five themed selections of literature. These include Virgil, History, Love Poetry, Women and Good Living.

How the course is taught
IB Latin is taught by two teachers who divide the language, literature and internal assessment duties between them.

Expectations/Homework
Homework is set once a week by both teachers and will usually consist of

  • Language work, such as a passage from Cicero and/or Ovid to translate, and/or revision of syntax or accidence
  • Preparing ahead in both set texts
  • Research work e.g., when working on the Dossier.

IB Latin is not a soft option and homework duties are not light; pupils are expected to keep up with work set, to maintain a high standard of work, to learn from mistakes and to read around the subject where necessary.

The Extended Essay
Higher Level pupils have to write an Extended Essay (4,000 words); they choose the title, research and write it by themselves as part of the IB individual learner profile.

Candidates can choose any of their six subjects as the focus of this essay; Latin offers a particularly rich field for an Extended Essay and candidates can opt to research and write about any aspect of Latin literature, philosophy, history or culture that appeals to them.

Preparatory Work
We expect students to read a portion of their set text authors in translation and research the literary and/or historical context of the works before starting the course. We would also expect students to undertake some light translation work to ensure they remain up to speed with Latin grammar and vocabulary.

A Level Latin

Content
The Latin language of Ancient Rome: candidates will study a range of prose and verse authors with a view to finally tackling unseen passages from authors such as Pliny and Ovid; candidates will also study how to translate from English-Latin although please note that this is NOT compulsory in the exam!

The Latin literature of Ancient Rome: over two years, candidates will have the chance to study two prose and two verse authors, OR one of each in greater detail; this year's students have studied excerpts from Cicero's De Imperio, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Virgil's Aeneid, book 6, and Tacitus' Annals, book 4.

How the course is taught
A Level Latin is taught by two teachers who divide the language and literature duties between them.

Expectations/Homework
Homework is set once a week by both teachers and should consist of;

  • Language work, such as an unseen passage to translate, and/or revision of vocabulary, syntax and/or ‘endings’
  • Preparing ahead in both set texts.

Latin is not a soft option and homework duties are not light; pupils are expected to keep up with work set, to maintain a high standard of work, to learn from mistakes and to read around the subject where necessary.

Preparatory Work
We expect students to read a portion of their set text authors in translation and research the literary and/or historical context of the works before starting the course. We would also expect students to undertake some light translation work to ensure they remain up to speed with Latin grammar and vocabulary.